The man behind ‘Bagieau’ Road

Entrance to Bagieau Road
Entrance to Bagieau Road

Where did the name ‘Bagieau’ come from ?

Bagieau Road has been our home and the home of Vineyard 28 for 23 years now. However, it is only in the past few months that we’ve learned about the origin of how it probably got its name.

My name is Gabrielle, Mark and Pip’s daughter, and I’ve just finished my undergraduate degree in history at the Uni of Melbourne. As part of my final history subject I was tasked with completing a research project on a topic of my choosing. Having been separated from my family and home this year due to border restrictions, I wanted to research something to do with my home.  Mum suggested looking into how Bagieau Road got its name. All she knew was that it was likely to have been named for Alexander Bagieau whose name is inscribed on the Yarloop War Memorial.

Who was he?

Alexander Bagieau moved to the Yarloop area from the Eastern States in 1912-1913 and was living and working as a jarrah hewer near Hoffman Bush Landing. When World War One began, he was part of the first wave of enlistments in September 1914, along with many men from the South West. He was assigned to the ‘B’ Company of the 16th Battalion and trained at the Blackboy Hill Camp up in Perth.

From there, Bagieau’s battalion was moved to Melbourne and then onto Egypt to join up with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force for the Gallipoli campaign. The 16th Battalion suffered many losses during their time at Gallipoli, having held some of the most dangerous posts such as Pope’s Hill and Quinn’s post. During the August offenses, Bagieau was shot through the chest and transferred back to England to recover, where he met his future wife Celia James.

However, he didn’t recover fully from his injury, so was returned to Australia. During his time back home, he stayed with the Scott family in Yarloop and also attended the first ANZAC celebration. Having regained his strength, he returned to England in late 1916, received further training in bombing and married Celia. Bagieau was then involved in an accident at the bombing school where a grenade went off accidentally and wounded his face. He recovered quickly and a few months later found out he and Celia were expecting their first child.

Yarloop War Memorial

Having recovered from his injury, Bagieau was then transferred back to the 16th Battalion who were stationed in France in September 1917. He joined them in Ypres, Belgium and the Polygon Wood battle, where he was killed in action.

Despite consulting the historic geographic data held by Landgate and cancelled public plans held by the Western Australian State Records Office, no evidence has surfaced that proves the road was named after him. However, it is more likely the case that the road was known locally or informally by this name and when formalised, the origins were left out of the records.

 

So, next time you take a drive up Bagieau Road to Vineyard 28, you’ll know the story behind our unusual road name.

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Wildwater Sparkling Pignoletto

 Sparkling Pignoletto2019 Wildwater Sparkling PignolettoWildwater Pignoletto

On Saturday 14th November we proudly launched our first Sparkling wine, the 2019 Wildwater Sparkling Pignoletto, in the company of our lovely customers and family.

Winemaker Mark regaled our visitors with the tale of how he was first introduced to the world of Sparkling Wine or ‘Bubbly’ as he calls it. Way back in the 1970’s Mark worked his way through University as a kitchen hand at the old Parmelia. At the end of one evening’s work there was a bottle of Champagne not finished, and he was offered it to take home. It would have been either a Veuve Clicquot or possibly a Pol Roger he thinks, but whatever it was, he loved it, and from then on made sure he got the unfinished bottles after his shifts each weekend. And so, the love affair with ‘bubbles’ began.

It was a couple of years ago during a visit to the research block of vines at Wokalup that Mark discovered this grape called Pignoletto. After a bit more research, he found out that it originates from the Emilio Romagna area in Italy. It takes its name from ‘pigna’, the Italian for pine cone, on account of its small, tight grape clusters. When he learned the Italians used it to make a sparkling style wine, we were in. Another block at the Wildwater vineyard was prepared and grafted over to Pignoletto in 2018.

The 2019 Wildwater Sparkling Pignoletto takes its name from the vineyard where the grapes are grown. Our lovely friend and local artist Yvonne Chapman was commissioned to create the artwork for our label. It showcases the terroir of the Wildwater vineyard – its landmark towering gum tree which is in the middle of our Pignoletto block and the guinea fowl who live amongst the vines.

 Yvonne & Mark launching Pignoletto

How is the wine made?

Winemaker, Mark, used ‘methode traditionelle‘ for this wine. The grapes were harvested on the 16th February 2019, whole bunch pressed and fermented to dryness in stainless steel. The resultant base wine was bottled and underwent secondary ferment on lees for 14 months, before being disgorged and corked in July 2020.

The resultant wine is a crisp, bright sparkling – think granny smith apples and crunchy green pear slices – this is our Pignoletto.

How do you purchase the Wildwater Sparkling Pignoletto?

Head on over to our Buy Wine page or just click here and it will take you to the right page. But don’t wait too long. This vintage was our very first and there is only a limited supply with our Cellar Club members receiving preference.

 

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Sparkling Pignoletto Release

2019Wildwater Pignoletto Sparkling Pignoletto Release

Saturday 14th November 2020

at the Cellar Door

3.00pm to 5.00pm

Bookings essential – Click here to Book

 

The afternoon will commence with a glass of the 2019 Sparkling Pignoletto.

This is our first production of a sparkling wine using our Pignoletto grapes which are grown in the Harvey Hills at our Wildwater Vineyard.

The label has been created specially for us from a commissioned painting by local artist Yvonne Chapman and friend of Vineyard 28. It showcases the Wildwater vineyard, its landmark towering gum tree and the guinea fowl who live amongst the vines.

Pignoletto originates from the Emilio Romagna area in Italy. It takes its name from Pigna’, the Italian for pine cone, on account of its small, tight grape clusters.

Think crisp green apples and crunchy green pear slices – this is our Pignoletto.

Winemaker Mark, will chat to you about the wine, tell you the story of the label and encourage you to sample it alongside some canapes.

You will also be able to sample the 2020 releases of our Sauvignon Blanc, Arneis, Dolcetto and Dolcetto Freddo.

A grazing table laden with canapes, cheeses, olives, and our awesome locally made artisan crackers will be on hand to enjoy with your wine.

On Saturday 14 November 2020 at 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM. Bookings essential. BOOK HERE

 

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Bunbury Wine Wander

Bunbury Wine WanderVineyard 28 at Bayview Bar, Bunbury

Saturday 7th November – 12 noon to 4pm

Ready to wander?!  ⁠

We’re thrilled to announce that we’re a featured winery in the Bunbury Wine Wander, an exciting new event that sees eleven Geographe wineries paired with Bunbury CBD venues for the ultimate, self-guided tasting adventure!

You’ll find us at Bayview Bar, Bunbury, serving tastings of three different but equally delicious Vineyard 28 wines – you’ll also be able to purchase some delicious gourmet snacks and meals at the venue.

Happening on Saturday 7th of November, it’s designed for groups of friends to explore and enjoy together!

But you’d better grab your tickets soon because they’re selling fast – head to

@bunburywinewander or www.bunburywinewander.com

to secure your spot now.

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Winter – Pruning Season 2020

Winter is our pruning season

Autumn in the Vineyard
Autumn view of the vineyard

As the autumn months come to a close the vines transition from all their glorious amber colours to looking quite bleak as all the leaves fall to the ground. The next change for our vines comes with pruning season. From late June through to August is the time we give our vines a big haircut, setting them up ready to burst in Spring and start working on the next vintage of grapes.With tw o vineyards now comprising of almost 22 acres of vines it takes a little longer than it did a few years ago. The majority of our vines are spur pruned, but the Nebbiolo is always cane pruned. Our younger vines, those that we’ve just grafted in such as the Fiano, Montepulciano and Barbera are also cane pruned, as in these first few years of growth it is all about establishing good structure.

Why do we prune ?

Grapevines are perennials. They shoot away in Spring, grow and develop over the Summer, are harvested in the late Summer, then die back over autumn and winter, to begin the cycle again the following Spring. We prune the vines because if we didn’t we’d have naturally bushy trees, with a mess of leaves and branches. Pruning and training our vines, helps us keep them organised and focused on growing grapes.

As the saying goes, ‘Great wines are made in the vineyard‘.

Spur Pruning

Muscat - before pruning
Muscat Vine – before Pruning
Muscat Vine after pruning
Muscat Vine – Spur pruned

You’ll mostly look out at our vines in winter if you visit and see that they’ve been spur pruned., but what does this mean? The before and after photos of our Muscat vine  illustrate this or you. In simple terms we cut off all the current years fruiting canes back down to ‘two bud spurs’, keeping the original cordon and trunk structure in place. We count the number of spurs on each side of the vine, and this way we are able to control the amount of fruit each vine produces. Typically each, spur will grow two fruiting canes and each fruiting cane will produce up two bunches of grapes. Our many varieties produce different bunch weights. From there we do the math – number of vines x number of bunches x average bunch weight = estimate tonnage of fruit per grape variety.

Cane Pruning

Nebbiolo Vine - cane pruned
Nebbiolo -Cane Pruned

On the other hand our Nebbiolo is a little different. These vines get a big haircut each year, and are cane pruned. The cordons get removed each year and we reduce it back to two of the best fruiting canes to lay down for the next vintage. The canes are cut to a specific length determined by how many buds we believe the vine can cope with. Generally we work on 8-10 buds per cane, which equates to approx 16 to 24 bunches of fruit per vine. But as we focus on quality over quantity, approx 30% of this fruit is dropped just prior to veraison.

 

Pruning 2020 – Gallery

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Top 10 Wednesday Wine Facts

Jasper Wednesday Wine Fact

Top 10 Wine Facts as ranked by Jasper

For more than a year our trusty cellar door concierge Jasper has been sharing his knowledge of all things wine with his “Jasper’s Wednesday Wine Fact” on Facebook. Sometimes they are quirky pieces of information, and other times quite factual. We’ve reviewed the rankings and as determined by engagement from our Facebook followers,  here are the Top 10 Wednesday Wine Facts that you all enjoyed.

 

Here we go…

  1. The colour of wine is determined by how much contact the grape juice has with the grape skins.  This also impacts the amount of tannins in a finished wine. Rose for instance is mostly crafted by controlled and limited contact with the skins of red grape varieties.
  2.  Wine grapes are of the vitis vinifera family, and there are apparently over 10,000 different types.
  3. A  750ml bottle of wine contains the juice of approximately 600 to 800 grapes.
  4. There are 11 different bottle sizes. Wow! From the 187ml ‘Piccolo’ up to the ‘Nebuchadnezzar’ which holds the equivalent of 20 standard bottles. (A standard bottle being 750ml) Check out Wine Folly for all the detail.
  5. Not everyone likes wine. Some are even afraid of it. The condition is known as “Oenophobia“.
  6. There is a right way and wrong way to hold a wine glass. Wine glasses should be held by the stem, so that way the hand does not raise the temperature of the wine. The stem exists for a reason!
  7. The dark green wine bottle was an English invention. Sir Kenelm Digby (1603 to 1665) was responsible. Prior to this wine was kept in goat skin bags.
  8. The oldest wine cellar is located on the Titanic. When divers went down to the wreckage they surprisingly found most of the bottles intact.
  9. Grape varieties do not determine how sweet a wine is. Winemakers do. It all depends on whether they ferment all the sugar and convert it to alcohol. In the case of Moscato, they don’t, leaving what is known as residual sugar, giving it sweetness.
  10. How does a traditional sparkling wine get its bubbles? The wine is still when it’s bottled, but then yeast and sugar are added to the mix which create the carbon dioxide (the sparkle) as they interact over the next 12-15 months.

Jasper resting on the sandJasper - Vineyard 28 own 'concierge'Jasper during vintageOld Dog - Jasper sleeping

 

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Celebrate – Sauvignon Blanc Semillon and Arneis

SBS and Arneis

With all the happenings in the world we are focusing on the little things to celebrate. After a great 2020 vintage that was completed just as the Covid-19 crisis became fully understood, and a reality, we are pleased to release the first of our 2020 vintage wines – the 2020 Sauvignon Blanc Semillon and the 2020 Arneis.

Available now at the cellar door and online.

December saw some of our hottest days ever, our warmest nights and driest times since 2008.  The season started considerably earlier than usual with our harvest starting in the last week of January, up to 3 weeks earlier than normal. Many of our white varieties were harvested in quick succession throughout February, without any drop in quality, making for a busy time for us. A slight cooling off in March and some sporadic rain events slowed down reds to ripen on a more usual schedule.

We encourage you to celebrate with us and enjoy our new wine releases. Pop over to the website to buy wine.

2020 Sauvignon Blanc Semillon

This follows on from previous vintages. It is passionfruit on the nose, with dry citrus and lime on the palate.

The Semillon adds length and texture. Drinking beautifully.

$20.00 per bottle

2020 Arneis

A soft and aromatic vintage, with a rich textured palate of nashi pears to hints of citrus, with a crisp finish.

Drinking young and fresh or will cellar for 2-3 years.

$28.00 per bottle

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Month of May

Celebrating all Mothers in May.

During the month of May if you purchase 6 or more bottles of wine from us here at Vineyard 28 then you’ll be in with a chance to win this gorgeous handcrafted Lap Quilt made by owner, Pippa Nielsen.

The quilt is approx 1200mm square and made from 100% cotton fabrics.

So don’t miss out, pop across to the website and place your order. Last orders will be until 31st May 2020 to be eligible.

(Available only for wine purchases and deliveries within Australia)

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Vintage 2020

The 2020 Vintage here at Vineyard 28 in Geographe kicked off a little earlier than usual. On the 29th January we commenced with harvesting the Muscat Petit a Grain fruit destined for the 2020 Moscato Rosa. Sampling and testing in the weeks prior had suggested we’d be underway around first week of February, but a few warms days pushed the fruit along and Vintage 2020 began.

What followed next was 13 harvests of fruit spread across a short window of 5 weeks, at both Vineyard 28 and up at the Wildwater Vineyard. This made for quite a compressed vintage compared to previous years. It meant a busy time in the winery for Mark and the new wine tanks purchased this year have been put to good use. The Cabernet Sauvignon was picked on the 24th February, and then we saw a weather change. Some rain, cooler days and nights slowed down the ripening of the Nebbiolo. We were a little concerned it might be damaged by the rain, but it robustly came through to be harvested as normal on 25th March.

Overall 2020 has been a great vintage, the quality and yields of the fruit have been exactly where winemaker, Mark wanted them to be. There are some great flavours to be sampled once these grapes make bottle. This year Mark is increasing his use of wild yeasts from the vineyard. They increase the texture and character of the wines that are produced. So there will be some very interesting drops from Vintage 2020.

Throughout Vintage Jasper was everywhere. He loved being up early and out with the crew harvesting. But age has caught up with him, as generally by the afternoons he’d be found sound asleep somewhere.

Vintage came to a quiet finish this year amidst the Corona virus crisis. Normally we would have celebrated with our crew. Many of them have picked for us over 10 years now, Bruce Jones in particular has been with us for 15 years. For now we’ve postponed the celebrations and look forward to gathering the crew together once it is permitted and celebrate Vintage 2020 with a few wines and some great food.

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Open Online for Business

22nd March 2020

These coming months are going to be some of the most challenging and strange times for many of us. The Corona Virus is impacting us all, and in particular small businesses like our own.

As of Monday 22nd March 2020, our cellar door is closed to visitors.

You can still order wine online or by giving us a call on the phone or by email. We will happily freight wine, whether it be 1 bottle or a case of 12.

As business people and winemakers, we, Mark and Pippa, appreciate the support we receive from our customers who enjoy our wines, and we look forward to this continuing.

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