20 Years of Cabernet Sauvignon

2022 will be the 20th vintage of Cabernet Sauvignon harvested here at Vineyard 28.  (In reality there were only 19 wines produced, but in 2003 we created two versions, our usual Cab Sauv and a second known as the Tuart Red, so I’m sticking with 20 Cab Sauv in 2022).

Back in 1998 when Vineyard 28 first commenced we planted an initial row of Cabernet Sauvignon as a trial. That row still exists today, and in 2022 the vines will be 24 years old. The Cabernet block expanded quite quickly growing to an area of approximately 0.5 hectare here on the coastal property.

The first ever vintage was the 2002, although we did experiment in 2001 to make a Cab Sauv just for ourselves and family.

Harvest 2002

20 Years of Cabernet Sauvignon in 2022

  • Planted at Vineyard 28 in 1998
  • First official vintage = 2002
  • Produced approx. 18,000 bottles over the last 19 years.

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the world’s most recognised grape varieties, grown in nearly every major grape growing country. It came to prominence in France in the Bordeaux region where is usually blended with Merlot or Cabernet Franc. Despite this prominence, the grape is a relatively new variety, the product of a chance crossing between Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon blanc during the 17th century in south western France.

Cab Sauv Wine LabelsWine Labels

The Cabernet Sauvignon shows an amazing evolution of our wine label designs. From the very basic green in 2002 to the red version in 2003, to various forms of connecting to the 28 parrot to the current. I think we tried just about everything, but the wine inside has always been consistently delicious to drink.

Vintage Notes of Note

2002 was incredibly young, a much lighter style than more recent vintages. It spent 8 months in a combination of French and American oak prior to its bottling.2002 Cab Sauv

2003 was the year we received 70mm rain all in a 24 hour period. Miraculously the Cabernet survived this.  This was the year we produced two versions, the Tuart Red which had been matured in Hungarian oak, and our traditional Vineyard 28 Cabernet Sauvignon.

2004 to 2009 were all produced offsite at various contract facilities. It wasn’t until 2010 that Mark took over control of the Cabernet destiny, and we begun producing it here at Vineyard 28.

2011 to 2018 – Consistently good wines, always with an emphasis on expression of fruit, with a light hand on the use of French oak.

In the early days winemaker, Mark, experimented with some American and even Hungarian oaks, but ultimately feels the fruit we produce is best suited to French Oak.

Harvest dates for Cabernet have varied somewhat over the 20 years. Some years it’s been the first week in March, but generally it is harvested mid March.

Cabernet Sauvignon today

The 2019 Cabernet Sauvignon is our current release, drinking superbly, and will continue to do so for another 3-5 years depending upon how you have stored it.

2020 is spending some time in bottle, before its release later this year.

2021 is still enjoying its time developing in barrel.

2022 was harvested on Thursday 10th March 2022.

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Mark & Pip’s Fabulous Holiday

June 2021 – Mark & Pip’s Holiday Adventure

Mark & Pip HelicopterSouth Australia was awesome folks. We loved it. So much history, great little towns dotted all over the place with original stone buildings and interesting architecture.

Getting there wasn’t without adventure though. It seems 2021 wasn’t done with us quite yet. This holiday was meant to be a road trip, but an encounter with a large kangaroo just outside Salmon Gums ended that very quickly. The big buck jumped on the car and made confetti of the front drivers side of our Kluger.There wasn’t even a recognizable headlight left. The roo basically going at full speed and just ran into us!

Anyway, after some re-organising and much assistance from family we still got away to SA. This time via the flying kangaroo, Qantas into Adelaide where we picked up a hire car and carried on.

Highlights and Recommendations

Visit the National Wine Centre in Adelaide – an opportunity to taste and experience 52 different wine styles from across Australia. Head sommelier James Boden has created a great experience, and if you’re lucky you’ll spot a Vineyard 28 wine in the line up from time to time.

Robe – a gorgeous seaside village that we arrived in via travelling along the Coorong from Meningie, made famous by Heather Ewart in her ABC series ‘Backroads’. Robe had fabulous cliffside walks or cycle tracks if you like two wheels, and like many towns some fab old buildings. If you’re traveling with a caravan then head for the Beachport Caravan Park, all grass overlooking the beach. It would be superb in summer.

Flinders Ranges – definitely put this on the list. You can 4-wheel drive, haul a caravan in or just travel in a car. The most spectacular scenery. We stayed at Rawnsley Park Station and did some walks there and day trips. Absolute best thing was a helicopter flight over Wilpena Pound, gifted to us by our kids (they thought we needed cheering up after the car and kangaroo incident). Flinders is an amazing, ever changing landscape with just so much to see.

Wine and Food

In terms of wine regions, McLaren Vale was cool, we found lots of interesting alternative producers like ourselves there, Oliver’s Tarranga, Lino Ramble and Coriole were our faves. Of course we had to visit D’Arrenbergs – ‘The Cube’. Great views from up there, and if you like quirky weird art and creations then you’ll enjoy this place. We had one of our best lunches there with a great view out over the region.

The Cube
The Cube
Mark at Deviation Road
Mark tasting Sparkling at Deviation Road

In Adelaide Hills we also found a quirky cellar door with some interesting art and wines called ArtWine. We drove the Coonawarra strip, where there were grapevines for miles. Pip was happy that they weren’t hers to prune!

Bellwether was our favourite along here, housed in the 1868 Glen Roy shearing shed. So much atmosphere, and some delicious wines enjoyed beside the open fire.

Our last stop for a few days was in Tanunda, Barossa before flying home. Great little town to stay in with fabulous wine bars and food. You could almost wine taste and eat your way down the main street in the evening. We would recommend the 1918 restaurant, housed in a house dating back to 1918. Great wine list and delicious food. A great base to explore the Barossa in all directions.

ArtWine Sculpture
ArtWine Sculpture
Bellwether Winery
Inside the Glen Roy Shed at Bellwether

Best Wine of the trip

Mark’ pick was the WangolinaGruner Veltliner

Anita Goode is the winemaker a Wangolina. Her winery is in Mt Benson, about 15 to 20 mins from Robe. Like many of us Anita has a keen interest in the lesser known varieties. A bottle of her Lagrein found its way home with us.

Pip’s pick was the Lino RambleArinto.

Lino Ramble is in the Mclaren Vale. It is Two friends and a common thread: childhood adventures on the faithful treadlie,  lino floors, vinyl records, and board games. Their grape varieties are chosen with a focus on sustainability, intrigue and above all else, drinkability.

Best Wine Experience – That’s a tough one, as we had some great wine tasting experiences.

One has to be Yalumba which surprised us. Sitting by an open fire, being led thru a tasting by a very knowledgeable guide in a building steeped in history. Having the opportunity to taste their flagship Cab Shiraz, “The Caley” and for Mark seeing the cooperage where they make their own barrels of course.

The other would have to Oliver’s Tarranga, a small stone cellar door. Getting to taste wines, again with a very knowledgeable guide, but accompanied by warm oven roasted almonds, lavosh bread and a soft sheep’s cheese.

We would highly recommend exploring South Australia, so diverse a countryside with so much history tucked away in it’s little towns. There was always something to see. Of course the wine and food was also pretty good too. In the spirit of business research of course,  we tasted lots of Italians – Fiano, Dolcetto, Barbera, Montepulciano and Vermentino.  There were some great examples of these, and occasionally some not so great. Different growing conditions, climate and wine making make for interesting tasting experiences. Quite a few have made their way home, so we’ll have to let you know how they go.

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RIP – Jasper the Cellar Door Concierge

Jasper 2020It is with much sadness that we share the news that Jasper, our beloved Cellar Door Concierge has passed away. The time has come for us to farewell our fabulous furry family member, known to our many customers and their dogs.

Jasper’s Story – 01 April 2006 to 31 May 2021

The Christmas of 2005 Pippa received a gift card stating that her present from the family that year wouldn’t be available until April. When April arrived, Pip got a phone call to say she could come and choose her present. So off to Lake Clifton, Pip and Gab trotted to choose the newest addition to our family.

Jasper was born to champion red cloud kelpies, and he was one of only two in the litter. Gab was keen to cuddle the puppies of course, and we’ll never really know why, but Jasper stood out from his brother and came home with them that day. We often reckon Jasper was very lucky, as his brother went off to live in Tom Price. Those who knew Jasper will remember, he never ever liked really hot days, air conditioning was invented for him, so just as well he was chosen to come live with us.

Jasper commenced life in the family, under the direction of 2 kids, parents and the senior family dog, Garvin. (A black kelpie/border collie cross). Garvin was our first family dog, having made the move back to the west with us, and he was the inaugural vineyard dog. He transitioned very well from being a Melbourne dog to a country one.

Sadly, in June 2006, Garvin at just over the age of 13 had a stroke and commenced his forever sleep that same day.  We had hoped he would be around longer to knock the new dog into shape. Instead, those duties fell to our neighbours’ dog, Bundie, also a black kelpie. Bundie would visit regularly to make sure this new puppy in the neighborhood knew his place.

Jasper grew up alongside our kids, the development of the cellar door, and of course all the visitors who came as well. He loved walking in the bush around where we live, and he loved the beach. Visiting Preston Beach when the kids were swimming was great fun, especially barking at the waves. When the family took holidays, he mostly stayed at home with his favorite dog sitter, Steve, who he loved due to the sharing of vegemite toast each morning.

The first winter, when he was only a puppy, Jasper thought he’d help out with the pruning in the vineyard. That was until it rained. What was this wet stuff falling on him? Not liking it at all he positioned himself between Steve’s legs, ensuring the big raincoat covered him so he wouldn’t get wet!

Jasper worked 14 vintages with the crew, and every winter pruning session. In the last few years, he shortened his working day considerably and would often only visit in the vineyard for a short time before retiring to his beloved couch at the house. All our workers knew when they had reached the end of a row, because Jasper would always bark at them, as if to say you’re done now, we can go in. Morning tea and lunchtime were his favoured times of the day, as well as breakfast and dinner, well basically anything to do with food ranked very highly with Jasper!

Many of you will know Jasper as the brown furry dog, with a dodgy nose who greeted you when you first came to the cellar door. Jasper would sit on the lawn waiting for customers. When COVID-19 came along he was very confused as no-one visited for 3 months. Jasper loved other dogs visiting, and throughout his 15 years as concierge, welcomed and befriended many.

His first best doggy friend was Bundie, who being older was in charge. Then of course Kipper, who often came to stay when her family were on holidays. Jasper was much photographed and filmed.  A memorable day was when a bus load of Scottie dogs and their owners came to visit the cellar door. Jasper even starred in his own movie, ‘Jasper’s View of the Day’ made by our son, Bailey. Then again in 2019 in a short piece called ‘Jasper’s Holiday.Jasper with the Westies

 

These last few years have been quieter for Jasper and slower. Arthritis in his back legs and a trapped nerve in his lower back restricted his movement and ability to go for long walks. Instead, a slow stroll around the vineyard each morning became his thing before retiring to his couch for a long nap. Some days he would miss all the action at the cellar door, and other days he’d be there meeting and greeting.

Jasper gave unconditional love to us all. He was a much-loved family member, and brought much laughter and joy into our home, and the occasional frustration when he rolled in something ‘dead’. He loved meeting new people at the cellar door and will be forever known to many as the Vineyard 28 Concierge.

Jasper Vintage Time

Jasper – we will miss your presence in our lives. RIP – our dear ‘furritable’. Sleep peacefully xxJasper Asleep

Jasper ConciergeJasper - Vineyard 28 own 'concierge'

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Growing up on a Vineyard

What is it like to grow up on a Vineyard ?

Our daughter, Gabrielle shares her perspective on growing up on a Vineyard.

Early family photoWhen I tell people that my parents own a winery and that I grew up on vineyard, they usually think that it was a glamorous upbringing, with idyllic scenes of vineyard. At points it was like that, but the majority of the time it was just growing up on a farm – at this farm we grew grapes – and the 10 acres where the cellar door, winery and main vineyard are, was my playground.

I was recently cleaning up an old hard drive and stumbled across a collection of photos from my childhood of the vineyard which prompted me to think about some of my favourite memories of growing up and I will share a few.

One thing I used to love was going out on the tractor with Dad. I’m sure there are photos of me sitting on his lap on the old blue tractor. He used to let me ‘steer’ and do a loop around the vineyard. Things have changed now though, as last time I was home I drove the tractor when we were putting the nets out in the vineyard.

Making Wine

Gab & Mark making Semillon
Dad & Daughter

When I was in school, I used to get the occasional day off at the start of the year to stay home and help with picking grapes and helping dad in the winery. Then during school holidays Mum and Dad gave me jobs to do in the vineyard to earn a little extra pocket money. In fact, one vintage Dad let me help make the Semillon, so I got a few days off to be there for all the important bits of the wine making process and would go down to the winery after school each day to check on my wine. Other jobs I did in the vineyard included leaf plucking, pulling out the canes after pruning and tying down the baby vines to the wires.

Gab making Semillon
Making Semillon

The No. 1 rule from Dad when we were young was that we weren’t allowed to wear thongs out in the vineyard. This was to keep us safe as sometimes snakes and lizards were hiding in the longer grass. This rule is still something I follow when I go home and when I’m in long grass or a paddock where I can’t quite see everything on the ground, I’m extra cautious about where I’m stepping.

You’d think that growing up on a farm, I would have a decent tolerance for spiders and not be scared of snakes or lizards. I don’t. I’m still scared of spiders, especially after seeing some creepy ones – or as Mum would say ‘beautiful’ – in the vineyard. Snakes and lizards also still make me jumpy. There were a few times where I was walking from the cellar door across to the house and there was a snake on the driveway, laying in the sun. I immediately ran back to the cellar door to get Mum or Dad to deal with it.

 

 

and Now…

A side effect of growing up on a vineyard and having a winemaker as a Dad has been that I’ve seemingly always had knowledge about grape varieties, the characteristics of wine and been able to explain the process of making wine as well as what would be happening in the vineyard at certain times of the year.  It’s a skill that has come in handy as I’ve grown older and gotten into drinking wine and now get to have more in depth discussions with Dad about the world of wine.

Gab in Yarra Valley
Gabrielle in the Yarra Valley

At the time of writing this, I’m living in Melbourne, where I have lived for the past 3 years while I completed my first degree at the University of Melbourne and worked part time in the wine industry. I unfortunately haven’t been able to travel home to WA for over a year due to Covid-19 but look forward to the chance to see my family and the vineyard again.

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The Wine Dogs of Vineyard 28

Dogs are often the first to greet you at the cellar door here in Australia, and we thought we’d tell you a little more about the wine dogs of Vineyard 28.

In the beginning

In New Zealand, Pippa grew up with a Boxer dog named Bruno. He was the babysitter, making sure she didn’t get up to mischief as a small child. Apparently, they were often caught sharing a biscuit or two. Mark was never a dog person until he met Pippa and him being allergic to cats meant they were ruled out as a family pet option. So, when Mark & Pippa bought their first house, like many, they started out with dog before they got to the kids.

Garvin as a puppyPip and GarvinMark and GarvinGarvin, a border collie/kelpie cross, commenced life as a pup in suburban Box Hill, Melbourne, having left all his family back in country Swan Hill. He was named for Willie Garvin, the trusty side kick to Modesty Blaise.  Modesty Blaise was a British featuring a fictional character of the same name, created by author Peter O’Donnell and illustrator Jim Holdaway in 1963. The strip followed Modesty Blaise, an exceptional young woman with many talents and a criminal past, and her trusty sidekick, the aforementioned Willie Garvin, and their adventures.

 

Mark has a collection of these comics in his library. Garvin took to city life reasonably well as he had a huge quarter acre block and was walked every day. Garvin and Mark went to dog obedience school, where he was ranking as top dog of class until his last day when something got the better of him and he missed a command in his final test.Garvin

Garvin was a well-traveled dog, spending many weekends on the road, back and forth between Melbourne and the Victorian wine regions. He also flew West on holidays with the family, traveling in a cage in cargo, and then settling in for the long drive to Australind. Never once needing a toilet stop until he reached his final destination and the backyard at Mark’s folk’s place.In 1997 he moved with us to Western Australia to become our number one wine dog. He took to country life very easily and learnt very quickly not to tangle with the local reptiles. However he still got up to mischief in the house as one evening he ate a whole chocolate cake off the kitchen bench! Pip had made a cake for the kids to take to a school cake stall the next day, and left it to cool before icing. When she returned to the kitchen, it was to a floor decorated with chocolate cake crumbs and a guilty dog.

Along came Jasper

Gab, Jasper and BaileyMoving forward to 2006 there was a family decision  that it would be good to add another dog to the mix (and the kids wanted a puppy) The idea was that Garvin could mentor and knock the new dog into shape, making sure he understood life on a vineyard and how to work a cellar door. Jasper arrived in the April of 2006, a locally bred Red Cloud Kelpie (just like Red Dog). There was only the two of them in the litter, and we often say he was very fortunate that we chose him. His brother ended up in Tom Price, and to this day Jasper has never liked very hot weather.

Sadly, Garvin had a stroke later that same year at 13 years old. It was a sad day for us all to say goodbye. Especially for Mark, as Garvin had always been his best mate and shadow.

Jasper and 'Love Clancy'As many of you know, Jasper has gone on to have a great life here at the vineyard. During his younger years, he hated the rain. He loved being in the vineyard with Pip when she was pruning, but if it rained, he’d dive between her legs to get the benefit of her raincoat. Vintage has always been a favorite time of year for him with a crew of workers to tag along behind and all those grapes to be stolen from the crates, and Jasper & Kipperof course morning tea.

He has always enjoyed the company of other dogs. It would be remiss of me not to mention our other honorary vineyard dog, Kippa, who often has sleep overs with us when her family are away. Many a customer has fallen into the trap of throwing a stick for Kippa at the cellar door, not realising that she can keep the game up all day!

Jasper has been the cellar door concierge all his working life, and in recent months has mostly retired from these duties, preferring to sleep his days away on his favorite couch. He is most definitely in his twilight years, but we still see glimpses of the puppy in him when he grabs his tug-toy out of the basket to play!

Jasper on the couch Jasper 2020

 

Jasper - Vineyard 28 own 'concierge'

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The man behind ‘Bagieau’ Road

Entrance to Bagieau Road
Entrance to Bagieau Road

Where did the name ‘Bagieau’ come from ?

Bagieau Road has been our home and the home of Vineyard 28 for 23 years now. However, it is only in the past few months that we’ve learned about the origin of how it probably got its name.

My name is Gabrielle, Mark and Pip’s daughter, and I’ve just finished my undergraduate degree in history at the Uni of Melbourne. As part of my final history subject I was tasked with completing a research project on a topic of my choosing. Having been separated from my family and home this year due to border restrictions, I wanted to research something to do with my home.  Mum suggested looking into how Bagieau Road got its name. All she knew was that it was likely to have been named for Alexander Bagieau whose name is inscribed on the Yarloop War Memorial.

Who was he?

Alexander Bagieau moved to the Yarloop area from the Eastern States in 1912-1913 and was living and working as a jarrah hewer near Hoffman Bush Landing. When World War One began, he was part of the first wave of enlistments in September 1914, along with many men from the South West. He was assigned to the ‘B’ Company of the 16th Battalion and trained at the Blackboy Hill Camp up in Perth.

From there, Bagieau’s battalion was moved to Melbourne and then onto Egypt to join up with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force for the Gallipoli campaign. The 16th Battalion suffered many losses during their time at Gallipoli, having held some of the most dangerous posts such as Pope’s Hill and Quinn’s post. During the August offenses, Bagieau was shot through the chest and transferred back to England to recover, where he met his future wife Celia James.

However, he didn’t recover fully from his injury, so was returned to Australia. During his time back home, he stayed with the Scott family in Yarloop and also attended the first ANZAC celebration. Having regained his strength, he returned to England in late 1916, received further training in bombing and married Celia. Bagieau was then involved in an accident at the bombing school where a grenade went off accidentally and wounded his face. He recovered quickly and a few months later found out he and Celia were expecting their first child.

Yarloop War Memorial

Having recovered from his injury, Bagieau was then transferred back to the 16th Battalion who were stationed in France in September 1917. He joined them in Ypres, Belgium and the Polygon Wood battle, where he was killed in action.

Despite consulting the historic geographic data held by Landgate and cancelled public plans held by the Western Australian State Records Office, no evidence has surfaced that proves the road was named after him. However, it is more likely the case that the road was known locally or informally by this name and when formalised, the origins were left out of the records.

 

So, next time you take a drive up Bagieau Road to Vineyard 28, you’ll know the story behind our unusual road name.

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Top 10 Wednesday Wine Facts

Jasper Wednesday Wine Fact

Top 10 Wine Facts as ranked by Jasper

For more than a year our trusty cellar door concierge Jasper has been sharing his knowledge of all things wine with his “Jasper’s Wednesday Wine Fact” on Facebook. Sometimes they are quirky pieces of information, and other times quite factual. We’ve reviewed the rankings and as determined by engagement from our Facebook followers,  here are the Top 10 Wednesday Wine Facts that you all enjoyed.

 

Here we go…

  1. The colour of wine is determined by how much contact the grape juice has with the grape skins.  This also impacts the amount of tannins in a finished wine. Rose for instance is mostly crafted by controlled and limited contact with the skins of red grape varieties.
  2.  Wine grapes are of the vitis vinifera family, and there are apparently over 10,000 different types.
  3. A  750ml bottle of wine contains the juice of approximately 600 to 800 grapes.
  4. There are 11 different bottle sizes. Wow! From the 187ml ‘Piccolo’ up to the ‘Nebuchadnezzar’ which holds the equivalent of 20 standard bottles. (A standard bottle being 750ml) Check out Wine Folly for all the detail.
  5. Not everyone likes wine. Some are even afraid of it. The condition is known as “Oenophobia“.
  6. There is a right way and wrong way to hold a wine glass. Wine glasses should be held by the stem, so that way the hand does not raise the temperature of the wine. The stem exists for a reason!
  7. The dark green wine bottle was an English invention. Sir Kenelm Digby (1603 to 1665) was responsible. Prior to this wine was kept in goat skin bags.
  8. The oldest wine cellar is located on the Titanic. When divers went down to the wreckage they surprisingly found most of the bottles intact.
  9. Grape varieties do not determine how sweet a wine is. Winemakers do. It all depends on whether they ferment all the sugar and convert it to alcohol. In the case of Moscato, they don’t, leaving what is known as residual sugar, giving it sweetness.
  10. How does a traditional sparkling wine get its bubbles? The wine is still when it’s bottled, but then yeast and sugar are added to the mix which create the carbon dioxide (the sparkle) as they interact over the next 12-15 months.

Jasper resting on the sandJasper - Vineyard 28 own 'concierge'Jasper during vintageOld Dog - Jasper sleeping

 

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Open Online for Business

22nd March 2020

These coming months are going to be some of the most challenging and strange times for many of us. The Corona Virus is impacting us all, and in particular small businesses like our own.

As of Monday 22nd March 2020, our cellar door is closed to visitors.

You can still order wine online or by giving us a call on the phone or by email. We will happily freight wine, whether it be 1 bottle or a case of 12.

As business people and winemakers, we, Mark and Pippa, appreciate the support we receive from our customers who enjoy our wines, and we look forward to this continuing.

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Autumn New Wine Releases

Just as the weather begins to cool and we head into the Autumn months, we are ready to share our new wine releases – the latest vintages of Cabernet Sauvignon and Nebbiolo.

Cabernet & Nebbiolo - new wine releases

The 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon is our usual fruit driven style. Lots of great berry fruit on the palate, luscious with a dry finish. $25.00 per bottle

The 2018 Nebbiolo is quite special this year. A slight change in winemaking practise, with 30% of the fruit undergoing wild ferment has added great depth to this wine. It was recently awarded 4 stars in the Winestate Italian/Spanish Tasting, of which the results can be seen in the March/April edition of the magazine.

As per the notes in the Winestate Magazine – “A bright nose of tar and rose petals with a well focussed longer vibrant palate of dried herbs, oak spices ad rose petals.”

$28.00 per bottle

We are looking forward to sharing these new wine releases at our Cellar Door, via our grazing and tasting experience, and also out and about as the opportunity arises.

We are planning to take them along to the Toast to the Coast Event being held at the Mindarie Marina on Saturday 4th April 2020.

The wines can also be ordered online via our website.

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New Wine Releases

It might be the middle of winter here at Vineyard 28 but we’ve got some of our exceptional 2019 grapes transformed into wine, into bottle and ready for you to enjoy. Available at the cellar door now and online. We’ll also be bringing them to the Perth Good Food and Wine Show in August.

2019 SBS - Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon

A fresh and vibrant, new release of our easy drinking blend of the Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon.

Dolcetto Freddo Label

Our gorgeous cherry pie, sweet chilled Dolcetto Freddo, which is a great accompaniment to a warming winter curry or even a Thai Beef Salad.

2019 Dolcetto

The one everyone has been waiting for, the 2019 dry Dolcetto. Rich dark cherries, mouth filling dusty tannins, a great winter warmer to enjoy now or over the next few years.

The wines are available to order online now. Free freight within Western Australia and $15.00 per case for our interstate friends.

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